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Jul 28
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Home Rule
George Washington on Residency Requirement for D.C. Officials E-mail

Historian Mark David Richards wrote about George Washington's directions on whether the commissioners appointed to lay out the new Federal City should be required to be residents of such city.  President Washington consistently stated that it was "my clear and decided opinion, that those who were entrusted with the Affairs of the City ought to be residents thereof."

 

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Sam Jordan - "Congress Needs a Better Excuse" E-mail

D.C. statehood activist reviews the unsuccessful efforts of President Lyndon B. Johnson to get home rule for the District. As he notes, "District residents might well reflect on this history. If we don’t make the case for enfranchisement and complete autonomy with a solid local and national campaign, we must not depend upon Congress to do it for us." For full article, read more.

 

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Testimony of Historians at D.C. Council Hearing May 13, 2009 E-mail

Council Member Michael A. Brown, Chair of the Special Committee on Statehood and Self-Determination, invited several noted historians to testify about the history of the District of Columbia and the impact of that history on D.C.'s struggle for voting rights and statehood.  

Professor Kenneth R. Bowling is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the History Department at The George Washington University. He spoke about the early history of the new national capital (1779-1801). His testimony follows.

C.R. Gibbs, a historian, author, Smithsonian Institution Scholar and Founder of the African History and Culture Lecture Series, spoke about the District's history during the early Mayoral Period (1802-1871), the period of the Territorial government (1871-1874), and the period of Presidentially appointed three member commission government (1874-1961).  His testimony follows.

Samuel Jordan, is a D.C. human rights lawyer and former chairperson of the D.C. Statehood Party and member of D.C. Statehood - Yew We Can!.  His testimony follows.

 

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